Saturday, April 29, 2017

Will Medicaid drown in a high risk pool?

Rumor has it that Republican leadership may lure "moderates" holding out against AHCA passage by throwing perhaps $100 billion over ten years into high risk pools. Moderates could then declare themselves satisfied that prospective individual market enrollees who have pre-existing conditions will have access to coverage.

Leaving aside the historic poor performance of high risk pools, this reinforces my fear that all the public hand-wringing about medical underwriting is a smokescreen, giving moderates cover to eventually sign onto a bill that still rolls back the Medicaid expansion and cripples all Medicaid via per capita caps.

In fact, the patchwork of funding grants slapped onto the bill via amendment  (pregnant women and addiction! invisible risk! more medical expense deduction!) can be used to obfuscate and only modestly soften the original AHCA's basic math: over ten years, $1.2 trillion in healthcare spending cuts offsetting $880 in revenue loss stemming from repeal of the ACA's taxes and mandates. In the original bill, the spending cuts include:

Friday, April 28, 2017

The pre-existing condition smokescreen

In a snappy summary by Axios's David Nather of  the latest AHCA stall-out, this caught my eye:
The holdouts are mainly worried about weakening coverage for sick people. Rep. Ryan Costello of Pennsylvania: "Protections for those with pre-existing conditions without contingency and affordable access to coverage for every American remain my priorities for advancing healthcare reform, and this bill does not satisfy those benchmarks for me."
What this tells me is that the moderates will ultimately go along with ending the ACA Medicaid expansion and girdling all federal Medicaid spending with per capita caps.  I have long worried that Republican relative moderates will go squish on Medicaid if AHCA damage to the individual market is moderated past a certain threshold.

Now more than ever, the bottom line remains what Andy Slavitt said it was two months ago:

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Sing away the AHCA

For months, New Jersey activists have been staking out the local offices of New Jersey Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen (NJ-11), a onetime Republican moderate pulled relentlessly right in recent years. While voting for almost all of the Trump agenda, Frelinghuysen stunned the world on March 24 with a pivotal statement against the AHCA on  grounds that the bill "would place significant new costs and barriers to care on my constituents in New Jersey. In addition to the loss of Medicaid coverage for so many people in my Medicaid-dependent state, the denial of essential health benefits in the individual market raise serious coverage and cost issues."

Noble words, but now Frelinghuysen is wavering -- with Ryan reportedly threatening to strip him of his treasured chairmanship of the House Appropriations Committee -- and Jersey progressives are going all-out to provide the counter-pressure, as in this petition.  With the AHCA risen from an unquiet grave, we are reviving old (month-old) arguments. So why not a months-old songbook? Here's one that I had to serenade solo in Morristown upon one freezing day. I can't say it's "sung to the tune of Hamilton's My Shot, but it's intoned to something like the rhythm of it:

Our Shot 

We are not throwing away our...SHOT
We are not throwing away our..SHOT
Ya know, we're just like Obama,
all action, no drama,
and we're not throwing away our..SHOT.

We're gonna stand outside your windows, Frelinghuysen
chantin singin make-all-kinda-noisin
until you let us freezin girlz and boyz in
to prove to you that Ryancare is poison --

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

The Kaiser misunderstanding

The Kaiser Family Foundation has a useful measure of how close to capacity the ACA marketplace is operating. Well, check that...Kaiser has two measures, and one has generated some confusion for some time.

The more useful measure is a national and state-by-state estimate of  Marketplace Enrollees Receiving Financial Assistance as a Share of the Subsidy-Eligible Population. For this, Kaiser combines analysis of enrollment data provided by CMS with Census data on income and insurance status. Importantly, Kaiser accounts for people whose income would qualify them for subsidies but who are disqualified by an offer of employer insurance, as well as people disqualified by immigration status.

As of  March 31, 2016*,  Kaiser estimated that 64% of those eligible for premium subsidies nationally were enrolled. State scores ranged from 92% in Florida, which has developed a culture of enrollment, with plenty of assistance available and advertised, to 31% in Colorado.** Kaiser estimated last October that 5.3 million of the uninsured were eligible for marketplace subsidies.

Friday, April 21, 2017

Tom MacArthur doesn't want you to know he's ready to uninsure millions

Defending his support of the ACA repeal bill, the American Health Care Act (AHCA), Rep. Tom MacArthur scolds a constituent who accused him of hypocrisy for "partisan finger-pointing." Yet MacArthur's rebuttal is riddled with obfuscations and errors.

1) MacArthur claims that a court found the ACA's Cost Sharing Reduction subsidies, which reduce out-of-pocket costs for low income enrollees, unconstitutional. Not true. A lower court agreed that if Congress does not allocate funds for those subsidies, as the ACA drafters intended and for which they budgeted, the executive branch lacks authority to pay insurers for them. If Congress allocates the funds, they are unambiguously legal. There is nothing inherently unconstitutional about them, and the Republican Congress's refusal to appropriate the budgeted funds is pure sabotage.

2) MacArthur implies that he's protecting the 11 million Americans and 500,000 New Jerseyans who gained coverage through the ACA's Medicaid expansion. Yet he supports repeal of enhanced federal funding for new expansion enrollees as of 2020. That effectively ends the expansion, as people typically churn in and out of Medicaid at short intervals. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) forecast that if that cut occurs, the higher federal payments will apply to just 5% of enrollees by 2024.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Tom MacArthur's faith-based waiver for the AHCA

Representative Tom MacArthur, R-NJ, has taken the lead in advancing amendments to the AHCA designed to bring both the Freedom Caucus and the moderate Tuesday Group aboard.  For the moderates, MacArthur writes that there will be an additional $160 billion in funding over 10 years to increase tax credits for older buyers and preserve Medicaid coverage for new mothers (was that on the block?!) and addiction treatment. For the conservatives, an amendment has been published  that would allow states to opt out of prohibiting medical underwriting or requiring insurers to cover the ACA's Essential Health Benefits.

Actually, the amendment begins by purporting to restore EHBs, community rating and guaranteed issue, the prohibition on denying coverage or charging more to people with pre-existing conditions. But it then tacks round and enables states to seek "limited waivers" to amend the EHBs, community rating -- and medical underwriting, if the state establishes a high risk pool.

How are those waivers limited? There's the rub. Beginning in 2017, the Affordable Care Act enables states to seek waivers to change the structure of their ACA marketplaces, but requires that the state's alternative plan "provide coverage that is at least as comprehensive and affordable, to at least a comparable number of residents, as this title would provide; and that it will not increase the Federal deficit."

Sunday, April 16, 2017

Trump logic, self-defined

A nation in which 40-plus percent of voters would choose for president a man who wildly insults anyone who criticizes or crosses him is a nation where emotional intelligence, let alone political judgment, is severely impaired.

Trump would presumably never admit, obvious as it is, that his insults and praise are determined purely by whether the party in question has been nice to him -- that "failed," "crooked," "cheating," "dumb" etc. simply means "criticized or crossed me."

Except that he just did:

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